Ok so you want to sell your products, courses, events blah blah online. You have a gorgeous website set up, you’ve spent weeks making it look beautiful, thinking about the perfect copy that will enchant your potential customers.

I bet you’ve forgot one thing, the legal boring dull bit… Terms & conditions…and not to mention your privacy and cookie policies.

You’re probably thinking well “no one even reads it” “I’m just a small business” “it’s just boring anyway”

These are all valid points, but yep, you REALLY REALLY do need these on your website, in fact, it’s probably the most important, if not THE important part of your site.

Terms and Conditions <yawn>

100% the dullest page on your site, however, this sets out the rules of using your website, however, there’s actually no legal requirement for defining terms and conditions.

(NOTE: If you are gathering user’s personal data, you are required by law to have a formal Privacy Policy – even if you don’t have a Terms and Conditions page.)

Terms and Conditions may not be required by law, but it’s still a savvy thing to include.

These pages can limit your liability and cover your ass if a customer decides take you to court, as well as protect your rights to the content you’ve added to your website.

If you’re ever facing a legal battle (hopefully not!), a court will look at your website terms & conditions to determine the contractual terms between you and the customer. So when you’re writing them, make sure you have this in the forefront of your mind.

So what should I include?

The actual content included will be specific and unique to your own website and the type of content you supply. However, if you look around within your own niche/industry you’ll find that they’re pretty much the same.

Limit Liability

So this is basically a section where you hold your hands up and waiver any liability from errors within your web content, really what you’re saying is that you can’t be held responsible for any errors in content.

So this will apply to anyone commenting on pages, blog posts etc,

Copyright

You should always include a notice about copyright/trademark. For example, “Copyright © 2016. www.yourwebsite.com.”

Privacy Policy

If you are collecting any information from your customers (such as email addresses or credit card information), then THIS IS a legal requirement. This outlines how information will be used – check out mine as an example

Set Governing Law

This bit is to mention where your website is operating from in terms of the governing law (state/province and country).

For example, “These terms and conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales”

But I don’t really know where to start! HELP!

If you’ve never put terms & conditions together before, it can feel scary and overwhelming. It doesn’t have to be! there are easy peasy solutions….

1. Copy someone else’s

Ok, I don’t actually mean copy it word for word. That is NEVER a good idea. however, you can use it as a guide and amend according to your own business requirements and rules.

2. Use a Terms and Conditions Generator

Hope onto Google and search for “Terms and Conditions generator” and you’ll see loads of sites to choose from that will do just this for you – generate Terms & Conditions.

Again though, be sure to read through it and make sure it covers everything we’ve already gone over.

3. Get a solicitor to do it for you

If you’re really not sure and still scared, then the best thing to do is to find a solicitor you can work with to put together your own Terms & Conditions. Obviously prices will vary but ask around your network to find a reliable company.

 

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